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U.S. Steel Signs Carbon Capture Deal

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U.S. Steel and CarbonFree have signed an agreement to capture carbon dioxide emissions at its Gary Works facility. The project will use CarbonFree’s SkyCycle technology to capture and mineralize up to 50,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year, equivalent to emissions produced by nearly 12,000 passenger cars annually.

There will be an opportunity to expand the program in subsequent years.

U. S. Steel’s involvement aligns with its goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions intensity 20 percent by 2030 and achieving net-zero emissions by 2050. In addition, the initial SkyCycle project responds to the increasing demand for low emissions products, such as verdeX advanced sustainable steel, from customers. The project is the first step in exploring the scalability of this technology for potential future implementation across the enterprise.

Construction on the SkyCycle plant in the U. S. Steel Gary Works facility is expected to begin as early as this summer with operations projected to begin in 2026. The definitive agreement has a term of 20 years following its in-service date.

CarbonFree’s SkyCycle solution captures carbon emissions from hard-to-abate industrial sources before they enter the atmosphere and converts them into a carbon-neutral version of calcium carbonate, which is essential to the creation of paper and plastics, as well as personal care, paint and building products. CarbonFree-produced calcium carbonate made from captured carbon dioxide can help decarbonize global supply chains by enabling manufacturers to reduce Scope 3 emissions, or it can be stored in an environmentally conscious way without the need for pipelines or disposal wells.

“U. S. Steel is setting a precedent for how manufacturers can and must proactively manage their carbon emissions, and CarbonFree is honored to play a role in this legacy,” said Martin Keighley, CEO of CarbonFree. “At CarbonFree, we are pioneering profitable carbon capture utilization through disruptive specialty chemical manufacturing using waste carbon dioxide as a primary feedstock.”